That might be a good idea. grin

I would like to clarify something I wrote in case someone is confused by it. Above I wrote, "There is but only ONE faith which brings salvation from justification through sanctification to glorification for all eternity.". It is true in every language and it is certainly true in the language(s) of Scripture, that words may have and often do have different meanings depending upon the context. I mentioned this too in regard to the word 'justify'. The same is true for the word 'faith'. For example, there is a true saving faith, there are myriad false faiths, faith can mean doctrinal standards (cf. Jude 1:3), etc. Now, the faith that justifies which Paul certainly wrote much about, even more than any other of the biblical writers, is the same which James wrote about, i.e., the faith which justifies. The difference between Paul and James is NOT in regard to 'faith', but rather how they use the word 'justify'. Paul most everywhere focused upon faith as the instrument that brings one in union with Christ, being reconciled to God by the instrument of faith resting upon the person of the Lord Jesus Christ and consequently His righteousness being imputed to the believer's account. James, on the other hand, again has the very same faith in mind, but he focused upon the fullness, the evidence of that faith, i.e., James in his second chapter was writing about sanctification, which is evidence of one possessing saving faith. Looking at this from another perspective, James was simply saying, one is warranted to claim to be a believer and one can be recognized and received as being a believer, i.e. as James actually wrote, "
Ye see then how that by works a man is justified, and not by faith only.
". James is arguing against "Easy Believism" (and some of you think this started with Charles Finney and/or Robert Sandeman), which is perspicuously wrong when one reads the CONTEXT of what precedes verse 24 of chapter 2. James focused upon the expected expression of a true saving faith, which is evidenced in how a person lives and is thus 'justified' by their profession of faith. A person is excommunicated because their life is not consistent with their profession of faith, i.e., their profession to have believed upon Christ and thus they are justified, is contrary to what they believe doctrinally and/or how they live and therefore they are not justified in claiming to be a true believer.


[Linked Image]

simul iustus et peccator

[Linked Image]