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Of all the features of St. Paul’s character, untiring activity was the most striking. From Paul’s early history, which tells us of his personal exertions in wasting the infant Church, when he was a “blasphemer, and a persecutor, and injurious,” it is quite obvious that this was the prominent characteristic of his natural mind. But when it pleased the Lord Jesus Christ to show forth in him all long-suffering, and to make him a pattern to them which should afterwards believe on Him, it is beautiful and most instructive to see how the natural features of this daringly bad man became not only sanctified, but invigorated and enlarged; so true it is that they that are in Christ are a new creation: “Old things pass away, and all things become new.” “Troubled on every side, yet not distressed; perplexed, but not in despair; persecuted, but not forsaken; cast down, but not destroyed;” this was a faithful picture of the life of the converted Paul. Knowing the terrors of the Lord, and the fearful situation of all who were yet in their sins, he made it the business of his life to persuade men; striving if, by any means, he might commend the truth to their consciences. “For (he says) whether we be beside ourselves, it is to God; or whether we be sober, it is for your cause” (verse 13).

Whether the world think us wise or mad, the cause of God and of human souls is the cause in which we have embarked all the energies of our being. Who, then, is not ready to inquire into the secret spring of all these supernatural labours? Who would not desire to have heard from the lips of Paul the mighty principle that impelled him through so many toils and dangers? What magic spell had taken possession of this mighty mind, or what unseen planetary influence, with unceasing power, drew him on through all discouragements, indifferent alike to the world’s dread laugh, and the fear of man; careless alike of the sneer of the skeptical Athenian, of the frown of the luxurious Corinthian, and the rage of the narrow-minded Jew? What does the apostle say himself? We have his own explanation of the mystery in the words before us: “The love of Christ constraineth us.” (2Cor 5:14)

Robert Murray M'Cheyne is the author of this month's Article of the Month. He enlarges on the love of Christ, not our love for Christ, but rather Christ's love for us, i.e., for and toward us who have been effectually called, hearing His voice in our souls and fleeing to Him in repentance and true faith.

His subject is divided into four headings:
I. Christ’s Constraining Love
II. His Love Removes Our Hatred
III. His Love Stirs Up Our Love
IV. Christ’s Persevering Love

Don't pass this one by! nono grin

Read it here: The Love of Christ.

Or, you can always find it in the "Article of the Month" section off the main page of The Highway website.

In His service and grace,



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simul iustus et peccator

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