Quote:
“For we are unto God a sweet savour of Christ, in them that are saved, and in them that perish: To the one we are the savour of death unto death; and to the other the savour of life unto life. And who is sufficient for these things?”—2 Corinthians 2:15-16.

THESE ARE THE words of Paul, speaking on the behalf of himself and his brethren the Apostles, and they are true concerning all those who by the Spirit are chosen, qualified, and thrust into the vineyard to preach God’s gospel. I have often admired the 14th verse of this chapter, especially when I have remembered from whose lips the words fell, “Now thanks be unto God, which always causeth us to triumph in Christ, and maketh manifest the savour of his knowledge by us in every place.” Picture Paul, the aged, the man who had been beaten five times with forty stripes save one, who had been dragged forth for dead, the man of great sufferings, who had passed through whole seas of persecution only think of him saying, at the close of his ministerial career, “Now thanks be unto God, which always causeth us to triumph in Christ!” to triumph when shipwrecked, to triumph when scourged, to triumph in the stocks, to triumph under the stones, to triumph amidst the hiss of the world, to triumph when he was driven from the city and shook off the dust from his feet, to triumph at all times in Christ Jesus! Now, if some ministers of modern times should talk thus, we would think little of it, for they enjoy the world’s applause They can always go to their place in ease and peace; they have an admiring people, and no open foes; against them not a dog doth move his tongue; everything is safe and pleasant, For them to say, “Now thanks be unto God, which always causeth us to triumph” is a very little thing; but for one like Paul, so trampled on, so tried, so distressed, to say it—then, we say, outspoke a hero; here is a man who had true faith in God and in the divinity of his mission.

And, my brethren, how sweet is that consolation which Paul applied to his own heart amid all his troubles. “Notwithstanding all,” he says, “God makes known the savour of his knowledge by us in every place.” Ah! with this thought a minister may lay his head upon his pillow: “God makes manifest the savour of his knowledge.” With this he may shut his eyes when his career is over, and with this he may open them in heaven: “God hath made known by me the savour of his knowledge in every place,” Then follow the words of my text, of which I shall speak, dividing it into three particulars. Our first remark shall be, that although the gospel is “a sweet savour” in every place, yet it produces different effects in different persons; to one it is the savour of death unto death; and to the other the savour of life unto life.” Our second observation shall be, that ministers of the gospel are not responsible for their success, for it is said. “We are unto God a sweet savour of Christ, in them that are saved, and in them that perish.” And thirdly, yet the gospel ministers place is by no means a light one: his duty is very weighty; for the Apostle himself said, “Who is sufficient for these things?”

Thus is the introduction to this sermon of Charles Spurgeon which is still salient to the day in which we now live. Would God be pleased to raise up faithful men who would preach the true Gospel, that Gospel which Spurgeon and others unwaveringly preached during the time of their earthly labors of years gone by. And although Spurgeon directed his sermon mainly to men who were given the privilege of serving the Church in the capacity of the pulpit ministry, it is still very much relevant and applicable to every true believer.

You can jump to this article by going here: The Two Effects of the Gospel.

And, for later reading it can be found in the Article of the Month section of The Highway.

In His service and grace,
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simul iustus et peccator