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A number of people think King David's and John Calvin's situations are similar. The difference is David admitted his guilt and repented. There has been no testimony of John Calvin ever openly admitting "sanctioning the burning of Servetus", AND later repenting his sin AND asking for forgiveness. Even if he did, it was definitely not prior to him writing his theology books on doctrine.

Calvin's seminal work, The Institutes, was published in its second and third additions in the years 1539 and 1545 respectively. Servetus was not executed until 1553!

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This is not a witch hunt.

Oh yes it is. You are searching out how to sully Calvin's name in order to convince us that the soteriology we hold is false.

Guess what? It won't work. You are ridiculous to bring this charge against Calvin. Calvin had no role in either the law itself or in the final judgement against Servetus. And even if he did, he would have been congratulated by people on all sides; every major Reformer recommended that Servetus be silenced, and the Catholic Church as well would have had him executed for gross heresy. Shall we charge Christians of all times with being pretenders because they were men of their times, caught up in the sins of their times? Was every Southern slaveholder in the U.S. who called himself a Christian a liar, since he practiced an unbiblical form of slavery?

Do you honestly expect that we will all be perfectly aware of every sin we have committed before we die? What is of greater importance: specifically repenting for each and every sin committed by name, or repenting generally and genuinely for our daily transgression of the law?


Kyle

I tell you, this man went down to his house justified.