Quote
In contrast, Spurgeon described them as “undecided.” You must admit that your conclusion about the people was quite different than that of Spurgeon.
Perhaps Spurgeon's comments were in regard to something totally different than mine? The issue is "moral equipoise", which has yet on your part to be shown even exists in Scripture. The point I was making was that the people addressed by Elijah were already guilty of idolatrous practices; externally expressing their corruption of heart. The worship of Jehovah had been corrupted by the combining of Baal worship with that of Jehovah. That is why Elijah asked the question he did; i.e., to choose either one or the other. The text says that the people remained silent; i.e., they were unwilling to give up their sinful worship because they desired to have what they considered to be the best of both "gods".

But regardless whether or not there is a difference in conclusions between Spurgeon and I, this has nothing to do with the topic at hand which Spurgeon's quote served for nothing in proving this imaginary "moral equipoise" of yours. As averagefellar has already stated, and which I have insisted upon, being in full agreement with historic Christianity and biblical Calvinism, men only have the ability to choose according to their natures and not contrary to it. There is not even a hint in Holy Writ about some "neutral moral condition" you call "moral equipoise" which is given temporarily as a means by which unregenerate sinners are able to incline themselves toward God and then create a saving faith within themselves and believe upon the Lord Christ. Sir.... the idea is pure fiction. <img src="/forum/images/graemlins/rolleyes2.gif" alt="" /> What the natural man needs most is not some fictional "moral equipoise" but a radical change of nature; regeneration of the soul from which faith and the ability to exercise it originates.

In His Grace,


[Linked Image]

simul iustus et peccator

[Linked Image]