This is nothing new... making a subjective justification of what is clearly a sin by grading it on a curve, e.g., white lies vs. obvious blatant lies. The bottom line is that it makes what we as a fallen person the judge of what is most important to us vs what God has revealed as good and evil. John Warwick Montgomery openly debated Joseph Fletcher, who made "Situation Ethics" popular, back in the 60s, I think at San Diego State University. Fletcher used a now very common theoretical situation to challenge Montgomery's absolute truth and morals; specifically, Is it categorically wrong to lie under any circumstance? The situation was, to the best of my recollection, was... IF the Gestapo was ordered to kill all female children and you had a young daughter who you hid in a closet and the Gestapo came to your house and demanded that you turn over your daughter, would you obey the order or would you lie to save her life? Montgomery was very wise and stood firmly upon his Christian profession and his belief that the Bible is the sole authority in all matters of doctrine and life. 1) I have no idea what I would say in that situation until it actually happened. I hope that the Spirit of God would give me the wisdom and strength to do what is allowed by God, for in every situation where believers are tempted, the promise: "...but God is faithful, who will not suffer you to be tempted above that ye are able; but will with the temptation also make a way to escape, that ye may be able to bear it." (1Cor 10:13). 2) I could simply refuse to answer. 3) However, if I did lie about my daughter's whereabouts then I would confess that sin and petition God to forgive me. (Ps 5:6; Acts 5:3; Rom 1:29; Col 3:9; Jam 3:14; 1Jh 1:21)


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simul iustus et peccator

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