Of the views generally held by the Reformers on the subject of the organization of the Church, there are two which have been always very offensive to men of a loose and latitudinarian tendency viz. the alleged unlawfulness of introducing into the worship and government of the Church anything which is not positively warranted by Scripture, and the permanent binding obligation of a particular form of Church government. The second of these principles may be regarded, in one aspect of it, as comprehended in the first. But it may be proper to make a few observations upon them separately, in the order in which they have now been stated.


As noted in the introductory remark quoted above, William Cunningham seeks to delve into two areas of contention; 1) Worship: whether the Scriptures teach that men may introduce into the worship of God only those things which are explicitly commanded OR anything which is not explicitly forbidden. 2) Church Polity: Whether the Scriptures advocate and restrict but one form of church government.

The author will be found to be extremely helpful in sorting out the various views and pointing to the biblical teaching on each of these subjects, which he also points out initially are directly related. With the ever-increasing variety of worship "styles" being introduced throughout Christendom and the ensuing debates over which is acceptable, this article should prove to be immensely helpful in coming to a right understanding.

Read this article here: The Reformers and the Regulative Principle.

Or, for later reading, from The Highway homepage, click on "Calvinism and the Reformed Faith" and then click on the "Ecclesiology" button on the left.

In His service and grace,


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simul iustus et peccator

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